Severe Headaches

Community First Emergency Room

Severe Headaches

Many Americans suffer from chronic headaches worldwide. While there are many ways to describe a severe headache, many describe the overwhelming feeling the same. A moderate-to-severe pain (often described as a pounding, throbbing pain) that originates from one side of the head, neck, or scalp. At times, the pain can be debilitating. Don’t let your suffering go undiagnosed or under-treated. Seek medical care as soon as you notice severe or persistent headache symptoms.

  • Fatigue
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea or vomiting, upset stomach, abdominal pain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dizziness
  • Very warm or cold sensations
  • Fever
  • Paleness
  • Sudden loss of vision or balance
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Seizures or extreme sensitivity to sound, light or smell

Severe Headaches Features

Here are the two main types of headaches:

Generalized pain:

Primary headaches don’t point to any underlying conditions. Instead, they are often triggered by stress, poor-posture, over-exertion, or dysfunction with the pain-sensitive nerves in your skull.

These headaches include:

Thunderclap Headaches:

  A sudden and excruciating headache that comes on as fast as a clap of thunder.

Rebound Headaches:

Headaches caused by the regular, long-term use of pain medications to treat headaches.

Sinus Headaches:

Headaches caused by inflammation of the sinus cavity.

Spinal Headaches:

Occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid that cushions the brain leaks out of the meninges.

Occasional headaches are common, and usually don’t require medical attention. However, for recurring severe headache symptoms, it is always best to visit a doctor for guidance and treatment.

Primary Headaches

A headache is secondary when another condition causes it. Many factors can trigger secondary headaches, such as:

  • A medical condition like high blood pressure
  • Infections, like a sinus infection
  • Brain injury, like a concussion
  • Blood vessel problems due to a stroke or brain aneurysm

In such cases, a physical examination should be conducted by a doctor to look for warning signs that could point to a secondary headache.

These include:

 

Thunderclap Headaches:

  A sudden and excruciating headache that comes on as fast as a clap of thunder.

Rebound Headaches:

Headaches caused by the regular, long-term use of pain medications to treat headaches.

Sinus Headaches:

Headaches caused by inflammation of the sinus cavity.

Spinal Headaches:

Occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid that cushions the brain leaks out of the meninges.

Occasional headaches are common, and usually don’t require medical attention. However, for recurring severe headache symptoms, it is always best to visit a doctor for guidance and treatment.

However, the main causes of abdominal pain include:

  • Infection
  • Abnormal growths
  • Inflammation
  • Obstruction (blockage)
  • Intestinal disorders

Women may also experience lower abdominal pain during menstruation, but these cramps are more commonly known to cause pelvic pain.

You may also get abdominal pain if you’re lactose intolerant or have ulcers or pelvic inflammatory disease. The most common include:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Gluten intolerance (celiac disease)
  • Hernia
  • Kidney stones
  • Gallbladder stones (gallstones)
  • Appendicitis (ruptured appendix) or any other ruptured abdominal organ
  • Endometriosis
  • Appendicitis
  • Diverticulitis

Less common causes of abdominal pain include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Gastroenteritis (stomach flu)
  • Acid reflux
  • Vomiting
  • Food poisoning
  • Stress
  • Parasitic infection

It’s perfectly normal for mild abdominal pain to go away without treatment. However, in some cases, abdominal pain is too severe for our bodies to handle without proper treatment.

You should seek immediate medical care if you are experiencing:

  • Bloody stools
  • Pain during pregnancy
  • A fever over 101F
  • Vomiting up blood
  • Pain that started within a week of having abdominal surgery or a gastrointestinal procedure (even a diagnostic endoscopy)
  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling or severe tenderness of the abdomen

Since many of these symptoms tend to overlap, the best way to determine whether you need urgent medical care is to listen to your body and trust your gut.

Typically stomach pains are harmless conditions caused by gas, overeating, or indigestion. But sometimes, abdomen pain often signals a larger medical problem.

Frequent or recurring sharp stomach pain can point to more serious medical problems like pancreatic diseases.

If your abdominal pain is severe, doesn’t go away, or keeps coming back, talk to your doctor right away.

Consult your doctor if:

  • Your headache pain increases or jolts you awake, visit the closest emergency room as soon as possible.
  • You take pain relievers almost daily
  • You notice a sudden change in headache patterns
  • Your headaches are extremely painful or debilitating

Do you have questions about the services that our emergency room provides? Call our office today. We put your health first at Community First Emergency Room